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What is the purpose of a Re-entry Permit?

The general purpose of a Re-entry Permit is to allow green card holders, who have left the U.S. for more than one year, but for less than two years, back into the United States. Permanent residents who leave for less than one year can generally re-enter the U.S. through the use of their "green card" plus their passport. However, permanent residents who remain outside the U.S. for more than one year CANNOT use their "green card" for this purpose. Consequently, they must obtain a Re-entry Permit IN ADVANCE, PRIOR TO LEAVING THE U.S.

Those green card holders who remain outside the U.S. for more than two years must obtain a "special immigrant" visa at a U.S. consulate abroad, in order to re-entry the U.S.

A Re-entry Permit also creates a presumption that the green card holder did not abandon his or her intent to remain permanently in the U.S. because the law states that "A permanent resident or conditional permanent resident in possession of a valid reentry permit who is otherwise admissible shall not be deemed to have abandoned status based solely on the duration of an absence or absences while the permit is valid."

Re-entry Permits are also sometimes used by "stateless" permanent residents in lieu of a passport to enter some countries. This is because some countries view Re-entry Permits as evidence that the U.S. will accept the "stateless" permanent resident back into the U.S. However, if you are in this category, be sure to check with the consulate for the particular foreign country to make sure that they will accept a Re-entry Permit for this purpose.

Reader Comments

travel to vietnam

4/4/2007

I am a perminent resident of the U.S and holding a green card. I'll intend to travel to Vietnam in one month. My trip will last only two months.

My question is that: Do I need to have a RE-ENTRY PERMIT so that I can return to the U.S.?

Sincerely

Stefan

Permanent residents who

Permanent residents who leave for less than one year can generally re-enter the U.S. through the use of their "green card" plus their passport

I need to travel next month

I have to travel next month to India for 3 weeks (work purposes).
I was born in Cuba, and I have my Cuban Passport but is expired for more than 15 years. Can a get a Reentry permit so I can travel or I have to renew my Cuban passport?
also, I'm a U.S. Permanent Resident, I have my green card, and I just applied for my Citizenship and I'm still waiting for the exam appoinment, does that interfere with my traveling?
Thanks

Re-entry permit as Travel Document

It may be possible ot use a re-entry permit as a travel document, i.e., re-entry Permits are sometimes used by "stateless" permanent residents in lieu of a passport to enter some countries. However, you would have to consult with an Immigration Attorney to review the particular facts of your case.

Re-entry permit

So as long as I do not leave the US for more than a year, I am ok?
What if I leave for 11 months, come back for a week, and then another 11 months, and then come back for a week.. etc..

Will anything happen to my green card?

Thanks

Time to use Green Card VS. Intent to reside permanently in US

>So as long as I do not leave the US for more than a year, I am ok?

Not necessarily.  There are two separate issues.  One issue is the maximum time for which a green card can be used to reenter the U.S.  The answer to that issue is one year.

The second issue is more complicated, and not clear cut; namely, whether the U.S. Immigration Inspector concludes that the green card holder abandoned his or her intent to reside permanently in the U.S.

So, for example, Joe Smith a green card holder leaves the U.S. for 11 months, on one trip, to travel around the world.  He seeks reentry using his green card, and is readmitted in permanent resident (green card) status.

Joe Jones, on the other hand, has resided primarily outside of the U.S. for 10 years, and has only returned every 11 months, and remained for 1 day.  When Joe Jones tries to reenter on his tenth trip, the U.S. Immigration Inspector concludes that Joe Jones abandoned his intent to reside permanently in the U.S., and takes away his green card.  Now, another Immigration Inspector might have concluded otherwise, and permitted Joe Jones to enter using his green card, but this particular Immigration Inspector used his discretion to reach the opposite conclusion.  So, this is why there is no "hard and fast" rule regarding this second issue.  Instead, it is best to obtain a reentry permit, and take other measures to establish that one intends to reside permanently in the U.S., if that is one's intent. 

travel document

my case is,im leaving march 2009 and im intending to file a reentry permit,my plan is im coming back here in u.s on oct 2011,is it ok to stay here in u.s just for a week then go back in philippines again?

Short stay in U.S.

Some people do that, but ultimately it's up to the immigration inspector to determine whether that's OK.

school matter

I'm a green card holder and im planning to go back in the philippines to finish my school, but it will take me like 4 years to stay there, so do you think they will allow me to stay there for 4 years? and how long will it take for me to get the approval if i will apply for re-entry permit by january 08?

re-entry permit process

how long will it take to process the re-entry permit?

Re-entry permit processing time

As of October 15, 2007, the government is processing reentry permit applications which were received on or before May 7, 2007.

My wife has a conditional

My wife has a conditional greencard (not the permanent greencard), and she wants to travel to China abroad for 3 weeks. Will she need to apply the re-entry permit? She does have a passport from her country.

need info

I came to the U.S at end of 2003 as refugee, and I have my I 94, after one
year and half I applied for green card, and I did the finger print twice (recent one on October 2007) but I have not got it. I am planning to go for stydy for twenty months to one of the carribean islands this coming september. I don't really have enough information about the immigration and how it works. Please I need some information, and I would be greatful for your answer.

Thank you
N.A.A

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